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interviews to the economy former member of congress from connecticut and i am the president of the united states capitol and historical society. this interview with senator daniel inouye is part of a special series featuring asian-pacific members of congress. in these interviews current and fellow members have relived their memories of people, places and events that have shaped their public career. it is our hope that these recollections will provide listeners with a deeper appreciation prehuman dimension of representative government in this temple of liberty we know as the united states capitol. senator daniel inouye was born in honolulu hawaii on september 7th, 1924 and was named after a methodist minister who had adopted his mother. in march, 1943, he enlisted in the u.s. army's 44 regimental a team. he saw combat in italy and southern france and was badly wounded during an engagement for which he was awarded the distinguished service cross which was later upgraded to the medal of honor, the highest award for military valor. with financial assistance from the g.i. bill, inouye graduate
will call the roll. quorum call: the presiding officer: the senator from connecticut. mr. lieberman: i thank my friend who is the occupy pant of the chair. -- occupant of the chair. i ask unanimous consent that further proceedings of the under the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. lieberman: i yield back all time on this side. a senator: i yield back all time on this side. the presiding officer: all time has expired. the question is on the nomination. a senator: ask the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be a sufficient second. the clerk will call the roll. vote: vote: vote: vote: the presiding officer: are there any members wishing to vote or change their vote? if not, the ayes have 92, the nays 1. confirmation is confirmed. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the chairman. the majority leader. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent that not withstanding -- the presiding officer: order in the senate, please. order in the senate. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent that not withstanding the pre
connecticut is recognized for two minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman but i like to take a few seconds. thank you, mr. chairman and direct working with but i like to take a few seconds to try to offset some of the criticism of you in which this hearing opened. of all the vast causes in the whether the difficult is that brought down the economy in 2008, no area i think is more complex than the areas that you've been charged to oversee, derivatives. not enemy, not for me, not activities of countrywide. this is one of the more catastrophic areas as will look back on when they were, and also probably the most complex area. and i salute you and couple that you are really working hard iran summit that is a normalcy challenging in the face of criticism but i exit the chairman of the committee when i say this. it is -- a sequence of the also forgets the devastation that was visited on this country, the trillions of dollars of lost value as a result of the downturn, the devastation that was visited, forgets one would like to nominate are bandied about and what kind of tsunami hit and the councils in 2
the wealthy but everyone. what it means, frankly, is whether you live in connecticut like the presiding officer or illinois like myself, every family is going to see several things happen automatically. taxes will go up. the payroll tax cut that has helped this economy is going to disappear. unemployment benefits are going to disappear for millions of americans who are searching for work, and many other changes will take place, none of which will be favorable in terms of an economic recovery. i think that we ought to stop and reflect for a moment here on lessons learned. here's what i have learned. if we're going to solve this problem, we need to do two things. we need to be prepared on both sides of the table to give, and that's a hard thing for many people to acknowledge, but we do. we have to be willing to give on both sides of the table. i remember senator reid receiving a letter after the super committee was hard at work coming up with a bipartisan proposal, signed by virtually every senator on the other side of the aisle, said do not include a penny of revenue. that was the end of
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